pictures. words (sometimes). blog nonsense.

another viewpoint

I make no secret here that I have my issues with the current administration (as summed up by Cheney’s abhorrent take on torture) and American politics at large.

However, there are a few things that I am very grateful for–such as increased aid to Africa. Here’s an interesting article from Time about that…although that has some eyebrow raising considerations as well. Africom? I’m pretty dubious that should be our “solution” to Hotel Rwanda-n issues, folks. Then again, if you have examples of US training security forces and succeeding without soiling our hands with innocent blood or future conflict, I’m all for hearing about ’em.

Your thoughts? How much merit does Bush deserve for increased aid? Will Africom (or similar initiatives) create another Afghanistan in the future? What’s the difference?

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3 responses

  1. Well, i think Africa’s response has been overwhelmingly negative about africom. so that’s dead hopefully. Now, when it comes to aid, no doubt Bush has been the most generous of all. His approach ot AIDS prevention (through abstinence, how realistic is that?)is not the most effective one, and pouring money has never been a solution. But hey, even I have to admit it’s doing a lot of good. My pessimistic, cynical mind can’t help but think there are some ulterior motives to this (counter China’s influence, Africa as an memerging oil producer…).

    http://amayelsnotes.wordpress.com/2007/11/08/africom-try-again/

    March 3, 2008 at 6:16 pm

  2. Katie

    I have recently been educated on foreign aid and unfortunately, most foreign aid is not given for humanitarian purposes. It is mainly given to buy off leaders of other countries to concede to our policies and to keep pro US governments in power…even if they are some of the most horrible leaders to their people. So, even as I applaud the use of foreign aid, I am led to wonder how much of that money is actually put to good use and how much of it is just used to cushion the leaders that we like the best, even some we shouldn’t like at all.

    March 3, 2008 at 8:18 pm

  3. Amayel,

    I’ve heard conflicting reports about whether or not Africom is dead…I agree, hopefully it is–but as you said (and I concur), my “pessimistic, cynical mind” is thinking that there are ulterior motives, and that they’ll find other ways to express themselves…

    I’m curious, what do we think of countering China’s influence? Obviously, international politics and foreign aid are often a chess game. Does this negate the value of US government-backed initiatives? Should we rely on NGOs and non-profits and refuse to send government monies/supplies?

    Katie,

    Yes, your point is often altogether too true. Understandable, however. An interesting question is, how can we try to force our government to put that money to “good use?” If nothing else, perhaps we can advocate Paul R’s suggestion (see my earlier post) that we freeze the assets of foreign leaders that are clearly abusing their power. Withholding the aid from the people themselves (even if they don’t get the full measure) seems pretty darn wrong to me (see the history of Iraq/Middle East policy).

    March 5, 2008 at 6:42 am

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